Ergonomics of a Standing Desk

As in previous posts we have discussed how a standing desk can lead to a healthier and more productive way to work.  We have also discussed the Optimal Standing Desk Height.

Good news is that if you’re reading this post about the ergonomics of a standing desk, you’ve already made the leap or are in the process of improving your overall fitness.  Good for you!

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Before we get to measurements, we need to discuss the primary complaint of new standing desk users.  Leg and back soreness.

While some soreness is normal while the body strengthens and adjusts to standing for extended periods of time, most of the initial soreness can be prevented by wearing comfortable shoes and using a standing desk anti-fatigue mat.   But not all anti-fatigue mats are designed for use at workstations, see here for our standing desk mat buyer’s guide which covers what features to look for, and our favorite pick.

 

Pictured below is a guideline to follow to make sure you are positioned correctly while you are standing or sitting at your ergonomic standing desk, whether it’s a adjustable height table or adjustable conversion desk.

Sit & Standing Desk ErgonomicsErgonomics for a Standing Desk (and Seated)

 The mayo clinic recommends the following ergonomics of a standing desk:

Posture: When using a ergonomic standing desk, keep your legs, torso, neck and head approximately in line and vertical.

Desk: Choose a desk that will allow you to keep your wrists straight and your hands at or slightly below the level of your elbows. Don’t use books or boards to change the height of your desk.

Monitor: Place the monitor directly in front of you, about an arm’s length away. The top of the screen should be at or slightly below eye level. Position your monitor so that the brightest light source is to the side.

Keyboard and mouse: Place your mouse and keyboard within easy reach and on the same surface. While typing or using your mouse, keep your wrists straight, your upper arms close to your body, and your hands at or slightly below the level of your elbows.

Key objects: Keep key objects — such as your telephone, stapler or printed materials — close to your body to prevent excessive stretching.

Headset: If you frequently talk on the phone and type or write at the same time, use a headset rather than cradling the phone between your head and neck. Experiment with various styles until you find the headset that works best for you.

Source: Mayo Clinic

About Kate at BSD

A health conscious foodie, helping you navigate the emotional decision of ridding yourself of the sitting disease. Best Standing Desks

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